Canadian HR Reporter

March 2020 CAN

Canadian HR Reporter is the national journal of human resource management. It features the latest workplace news, HR best practices, employment law commentary and tools and tips for employers to get the most out of their workforce.

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www.hrreporter.com 17 People — not tasks — are more likely to trigger emotional responses at work, and men are more likely to be emotional at the office, according to a study of 2,000 workers and 250 managers in the U.K. by Totaljobs. More than eight in 10 workers said it's OK to show some emotion to colleagues, but six in 10 have experienced an emotion at work they felt they couldn't express freely. • Men are 1.6 times more emotional than women about being criticized. • Men are 2.4 times more emotional than women because their "ideas weren't heard." • Men are 2.5 times more emotional than women about "having a fallout." • Women are 25% more emotional than men about "stress/frustration." WHO'S BECOMING EMOTIONAL AT WORK 78% of millennials would perceive their employer more positively if it offered a virtual care or telemedicine solution through its group benefits 60% of workers 55 and older would perceive their employer more positively if it offered a virtual care or telemedicine solution 52% of workers 18 to 54 say they would use virtual care to consult mental health practitioners 39% of workers 55 and older would use virtual care to consult mental health practitioners Digital overload at work Virtual health care Benefits preferred over salary boost Prioritizing benefits versus salary varies among the different generations in the workplace, according to GlobalData's 2019 U.K. Insurance Consumer Survey. The favourite benefit among baby boomers is a pension (39%), while gen Z prefer a good work-life balance (26.4%). Number of employees who would prefer a better benefits package even if it came with a lower salary: Baby boomers: 17.2% | Generation X: 19.2% | Millennials: 23.5% | Gen Z: 26.2% 87% of office professionals spend most of their workday staring at screens. 7 hours per day on average is spent by office workers looking at screens. 41% feel they are constantly bombarded by digital alerts. 49% feel screen overload is making them less productive. 62% think digital tools are making meetings less productive and unfocused. 53% use technology specifically to procrastinate at work. Almost three-quarters (72%) of working Canadians say they would see their employer in a more positive light if it offered virtual care or telemedicine, according to an RBC Insurance survey of 1,501 workers. Nearly nine in 10 U.S. workers spend most of their workday looking at the screens of various electronic devices, with almost half feeling screen overload is negatively affecting their productivity, according to a report by The Paper and Packaging Board in partnership with Kelton. Why work remotely? Telecommuting has its benefits. For 62% of respondents to the OWL Labs' survey of 1,202 full-time workers in the U.S., who work remotely, the top reasons for doing so are: 91% | better work-life balance 79% | increased productivity/ better focus 78% | less stress 78% | avoiding a commute

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