Canadian HR Reporter - Ontario

October 16, 2017 ON

Canadian HR Reporter is the national journal of human resource management. It features the latest workplace news, HR best practices, employment law commentary and tools and tips for employers to get the most out of their workforce.

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PM40065782 RO9496 October 16, 2017 Slight gains in salary predictions for 2018 Pay for performance important with tight budget BY SARAH DOBSON JUDGING by the results of the latest salary surveys, Canadian employers are feeling more hope- ful going into 2018. e mood among employers is optimistic, according to Sophie Fleming, associate client partner at Korn Ferry Hay Group. Individual base salaries are forecast to increase by an average of 2.6 per cent in 2018, excluding zeroes, or 2.5 per cent including zeroes, found its survey of 724 organizations. at's compared to 2.6 per cent in 2015, 2.4 per cent in 2016 and 2.2 per cent in 2017. "We're back up, which is op- timistic, and good news," said Fleming. "Of course, for Canada, our normal seems to be around 2.5 per cent — the days of three- plus per cent are long, long gone in Canada — but at least we're seeing a trend up." But there's also some hesitancy among employers when it comes to making fi nal decisions, and gen- erally businesses are being more careful because of continued un- certainty, she said. "While those who have decid- ed seem optimistic, there's still a number of employers on the wait- and-see (side), and maybe delaying their decision, so there's a little bit of careful attitude towards salary planning this year." However, freeze numbers are low, said Fleming, "so I think over- all we have an optimistic labour outlook in Canada, which is good." "Generally optimistic" is how Lucille Raikes, senior consultant, rewards, at Willis Towers Watson in Montreal, describes the outlook of employers when it comes to sal- ary forecasts for 2018. " e economy is turning around and employment rates are down, the indicators are out there, the Bank of Canada is increasing in- terest rates — all of that points in the direction of a better situation for next year." Just six per cent of employ- ers are predicting salary freezes, compared to 10 per cent last year, page 13 INSIDE Pay for performance Few companies assess the alignment between ratings and comp decisions Hurricane help Canadian companies send employees down south pages 2 Innovation First comes climate, then comes culture page 10 The Google memo Lessons to be learned on code of conduct, behaviour page 19 Credit: Mark Blinch (Reuters) View our new video or fi nd out more... it's a lot more than discounts fi nancial well–being award winning mental wellness physical fi tness the original perks company TM the original perks company TM www.venngo.com/perks 1.866.383.6646 ext.202 Company culture can outweigh pay: Poll Many would take ideal job even with cut in wages BY JOHN DUJAY WHEN considering a move to a new employer, many workers are placing a greater emphasis on a strong corporate culture, over and above the value of pay pack- ages, according to a survey from recruiting fi rm Hays Canada. When it comes to switching jobs, the pay package is less im- portant, as 73.4 per cent of work- ers would accept a pay cut if they found their ideal job. Millennials would accept a slashed salary of more than 10 per cent for that perfect position. "When people were making decisions on whether to stay or whether to leave, and whether to take a new job on, the weight- ing they were giving to salary on its own had reduced and they put more weighting into things like career progression, company culture," according to Rowan O'Grady, president of Hays Can- ada in Toronto. Generation Y workers (or mil- lennials) said they value work-life PERSONAL > pg. 9 Slight gains in salary Slight gains in salary predictions for 2018 predictions for 2018 Pay for performance important with tight budget Pay for performance important with tight budget BY SARAH DOBSON JUDGING latest salary surveys, Canadian employers are feeling more hope- ful going into 2018. e mood among employers is optimistic, according to Sophie Fleming, associate client partner at Korn Ferry Hay Group. Individual base salaries are forecast to increase by an average of 2.6 per cent in 2018, excluding Britain's Prince Harry speaks to an athlete at the Toronto Pan Am Sports Centre ahead of the Invictus Games in Toronto on Sept. 22. Transition to employment diffi cult for vets Language barriers, mentorship in spotlight at Invictus Games BY MARCEL VANDER WIER WHEN Joel Guindon returned home from Afghanistan with post- traumatic stress injuries, he knew he was in a tough spot. While the Gatineau, Que., resi- dent eventually found work as a Canada Post supervisor in Ot- tawa, he discovered his mission- oriented mindset didn't always jive within a unionized environment. "It was very diffi cult to transi- tion as a military personnel," said Guindon, whose military back- ground is in infantry and recon- naissance. "My skills obviously did not translate to the corporate world. So I had to adapt." Guindon also struggled with the eff ects of his injuries, including re- curring nightmares and hypervigi- lance that could prevent him from sleeping for days on end. BUSINESSES > pg. 6 DE-RISKING > pg. 8

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